Coca-Cola CEO condemns Ga. voting law amid boycott pressure

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Amnon Jakony (Jay Arts Holdings)

Coca-Cola President and CEO James Quincey attends a press conference with International Olympic Committee (IOC) president and China Mengniu Dairy CEO and Executive Director, as part of the 134th Session of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) at the SwissTech Convention Centre in Lausanne, on June 24, 2019. - The International Olympic Committee (IOC) in Lausanne, Switzerland, will elect in a final vote on June 24, 2019 the host city for the 2026 Winter Olympics. The two remaining host cities in the election process are Stockholm-Are, Sweden, and MilanCortina d'Ampezzo, Italy. (Photo by Fabrice COFFRINI / AFP) (Photo credit should read FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP via Getty Images)

Coca-Cola President and CEO James Quincey attends a press conference with International Olympic Committee (IOC) president and China Mengniu Dairy CEO and Executive Director, as part of the 134th Session of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) at the SwissTech Convention Centre in Lausanne, on June 24, 2019. - The International Olympic Committee (IOC) in Lausanne, Switzerland, will elect in a final vote on June 24, 2019 the host city for the 2026 Winter Olympics. The two remaining host cities in the election process are Stockholm-Are, Sweden, and MilanCortina d'Ampezzo, Italy. (Photo by Fabrice COFFRINI / AFP)        (Photo credit should read FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP via Getty Images)

Coca-Cola President and CEO James Quincey attended a press conference on June 24, 2019. (Photo by FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP via Getty Images)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 6:48 AM PT – Thursday, April 1, 2021

Several Georgia-based companies appear to be caving to the cancel culture movement in the wake of an election law controversy.

In an interview on Wednesday, Coca-Cola CEO James Quincey condemned Georgia’s new voting law, calling it “unacceptable.” This came after Democrats and voting rights advocates claimed the bill was meant to enable voter suppression.

In response, activists led calls for boycotts of companies who didn’t refute the election changes, which will include restrictions on ballot drop boxes and added voter ID requirements.

African Methodist Episcopal Church Bishop Reginald Jackson announces a boycott of Coca-Cola Co. products outside the Georgia Capitol on Thursday, March 25, 2021 in Atlanta.  Jackson says Coca-Cola and other large Georgia companies haven't done enough to oppose restrictive voting bills that Georgia lawmakers were debating as Jackson spoke (AP Photo/Jeff Amy)

African Methodist Episcopal Church Bishop Reginald Jackson announced a boycott of Coca-Cola Co. products outside the Georgia Capitol on Thursday, March 25, 2021 in Atlanta. Jackson said Coca-Cola and other large Georgia companies haven’t done enough to oppose restrictive voting bills that Georgia lawmakers were debating as Jackson spoke (AP Photo/Jeff Amy)

 

Republicans have defended the new law, saying it’s necessary to avoid fraud and secure future elections. However, after standing their ground, companies are now bowing to pressure and changing their tune.

“This legislation is unacceptable. It is a step backwards, and it does not promote principals we have stood for in Georgia around broad access voting, around voter convenience, about ensuring election integrity,” Coca-Cola CEO James Quincey stated. “This is frankly just a step backwards.”

Meanwhile, the CEOs of Delta Airlines and Citibank have also conceded to Democrat demands and issued similar statements.

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