Political consultant says ‘we have to personalize and individualize our language’ regarding vaccines

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Amnon Jakony (Jay Arts Holdings)

Sharis Carr, a nurse at the Aaron E. Henry Community Health Service Center in Clarksdale, Miss., holds a vial of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine that was administered to seniors, Wednesday, April 7, 2021. The Mississippi Department of Human Services is in the initial stages of teaming up with community senior services statewide to help older residents get vaccinated. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

Sharis Carr, a nurse at the Aaron E. Henry Community Health Service Center in Clarksdale, Miss., holds a vial of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine that was administered to seniors, Wednesday, April 7, 2021. The Mississippi Department of Human Services is in the initial stages of teaming up with community senior services statewide to help older residents get vaccinated. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

Sharis Carr, a nurse at the Aaron E. Henry Community Health Service Center in Clarksdale, Miss., holds a vial of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine that was administered to seniors, Wednesday, April 7, 2021. The Mississippi Department of Human Services is in the initial stages of teaming up with community senior services statewide to help older residents get vaccinated. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 9:13 AM PT – Thursday, April 8, 2021

Political consultant Frank Luntz suggested the coronavirus vaccination process needs to be more “personalized.” In an interview Wednesday, he argued Americans have to “individualize our language” when asking for what we want.

Luntz went on to address why some people are hesitant to get one shot versus getting two and vice versa. He said the difference in vaccine preference was political.

“The hesitancy among Trump people is more for the Johnson & Johnson, the hesitancy among the Biden people is more for the two vaccines rather than the one,” he explained.”

This comes after a recent poll by Pew Research Center showed many Americans are hesitant to get vaccinated because they aren’t sure it will be enough to end restrictions under the current administration.

“It’s different for different people; we have to personalize and individualize our language,” Luntz continued. “We have to think not from our perspective, but from the perspective of people we want vaccinated and for business leaders they have to put themselves in the minds and concerns of the employee because that’s what really matters.”

In the meantime, the lifting of coronavirus restrictions appears to vary between states with some remaining in the lockdown mindset despite an increase in the number of people being vaccinated.

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